The Christmas season is nearly upon us, and what better time than the present to purchase some new reading material for a political junkie or policy wonk dear to your heart. Authors of two new books about Canadian politics will be speaking about their new books and signing copies in Edmonton in the coming weeks.

How We Lead: Canada in a Century of Change by Joe Clark
November 27, 2013
7:00 pm
Edmonton City Hall, 1 Sir Winston Churchill Square

Joe Clark Calgary-Centre MP

Joe Clark

Former Prime Minister Joe Clark will be in Edmonton on November 27 to talk about his new book, How We Lead: Canada in a Century of Change. Mr. Clark will speak about his book and share his thoughts about what is happening to Canada’s reputation in the world today. The former Progressive Conservative Prime Minister speaks from a unique perspective when he criticizes Prime Minister Stephen Harper‘s approach to international relations and how it has impacted our country.

Mr. Clark served as a Member of Parliament from Alberta between 1972 and 1993, and 2000 and 2004. He became Canada’s 16th Prime Minister in 1979 and served as Secretary of State for External Affairs from 1984 to 1991. During his time in office, he was known for taking a strong stance against apartheid in South Africa and his role in helping steer the North American Free Trade Agreement to a final agreement.

Watch Peter Mansbridge‘s One-on-One interview with Mr. Clark about his new book

Brad Lavigne

Brad Lavigne

Building the Orange Wave by Brad Lavigne
December 5, 2013
5:30pm – 7:30 pm
The Common, 9910 109 Street NW, Edmonton
Facebook Event

Brad Lavigne will be speaking about his new book, Building the Orange Wave, on December 5, 2013 in Edmonton.

Mr. Lavigne was the 2011 campaign director for the federal New Democratic Party. He served in many strategic roles with the federal NDP and worked closely with former leader Jack Layton. In this book, Mr. Lavigne is said to recount the story of how Mr. Layton and his team developed and implemented a plan that propelled the NDP from the fourth largest party in the House of Commons to become Canada’s Official Opposition.