Tag Archives: Alberta Press Gallery

Exclusive: Daveberta.ca now available exclusively in print paper editions

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 1, 2016

Edmonton – Marking the first complete Blog-to-Paper jump, daveberta.ca is now available exclusively in paper form.

“I am really excited about this new historic initiative,” said daveberta.ca publisher and founder Dave Cournoyer. “I believe there is a real demand for a paper print news publication in Edmonton.”

dave cournoyer daveberta

Daveberta.ca publisher Dave Cournoyer

“I’m thinking about calling it a ‘news-on-paper’ because it will be news printed on paper,” Cournoyer said. “Readers have become accustomed to reading my blog on their computer screens and mobile devices, but I really think the next frontier is paper.”

“From the bottom of my heart I want to thank the thousands of loyal readers who have followed this blog on the internet over the past 11 years,” Cournoyer said. “I know you’re all really going to love the convenience of the new paper format.”

“While blogs like AlbertaPolitics.ca have foolishly chained themselves to the limitations of the internet, I’m not afraid to make the leap into the next frontier,” Cournoyer said. “And that frontier is paper.”

He likened the blog-to-paper transformation to the resurgence in vinyl record sales and barber shops.

“Like classic LPs and old timey barber shops, news-on-paper is very retro,” Cournoyer said. “I really think 2016 is the year news-on-paper will take off and I will be at the forefront of it.”

The news-on-paper will include a regular feature called “Paper Twitter” in which messages from readers will be printed in each edition. “The beauty of Paper Twitter is that your opinions won’t be limited to 140 characters,” Cournoyer said. “It’s genius!”

Cournoyer also thinks there is an excellent opportunity to generate revenue because news-on-paper will only be available to those who pay for it.

News-on-paper editions of daveberta.ca will be available in street corner boxes across the city starting on April 1, 2016.

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For more information contact:
Dave Cournoyer
Publisher, Daveberta.ca
david.cournoyer@gmail.com

Journalism degrees or degrees of journalism

This week’s kerfuffle over the Rebel Media website’s fight with the Government of Alberta has dominated the news cycle, demonstrating the lack of experience of an NDP government still in their first year in government. Here is a quick summary of what I understand happened:

  1. Rebel freelancer Holly Nicholas attended a technical briefing meeting for media before the release of the Royalty Review Panel report on Jan. 29, 2016. She says that she was asked to leave after being in the room for most of the meeting. It is not clear why she would have been asked to leave.
  2. Rebel freelancer Sheila Gunn Reid was denied entry into a technical briefing meeting for stakeholders before the release of the Royalty Review Panel report which was being held on the same day as the technical briefing meeting for media. It is my understating that no media were allowed entry into this meeting.
  3. Ms. Gunn Reid was not allowed entry into the Alberta Legislature on Feb. 3, 2016 to attend a joint press conference held by Premier Rachel Notley and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Neither was I, or was blogger David Climenhaga. On that day, I was informed by the Premier’s Communications Office that this was a decision made by the Prime Minster’s Communications Office.
  4. In response to a letter sent by Rebel’s lawyer Fred Kozak on Feb. 8, 2016, a letter from a government lawyer on Feb. 12, 2016 stated the government believes that Rebel and those identifying as being connected to the website are not journalists and not entitled to access media lock-ups or other events.

The fourth point in the most mind-boggling. The Government of Alberta does not have the authority to decide who is and who is not a “journalist.” I cannot understand how someone in government thought that response would be a good idea. It makes the NDP look heavy-handed and is a good example of what the right-wing fringe means when it uses the phrase ‘nanny-state.”

Founded by former lobbyist and Sun TV host Ezra Levant, the Rebel website speaks to Alberta’s right-wing fringe and essentially operates with the characteristics of an opposition group. I find much of their coverage distasteful and intentionally provocative, but they should be allowed to attend government media events, just as other media and opposition groups would be allowed.

As Warren Kinsella and Jason Markusoff pointed out, this is exactly the reaction that Mr. Levant and his crew wanted. And even though the NDP backed down from the ban today, they have already delivered Mr. Levant the attention he sought.

Heather Boyd, the former western bureau director for Canadian Press, has been recruited by the government to recommend new rules for media access. It would be a step backward for media in Alberta if new rules restrict access and participation of new online media.

Ms. Boyd’s recommendations will be submitted to the government in two or three weeks, which means this issue will become a topic of media coverage as MLAs return for the spring session of the Legislative Assembly and the government presents a Speech from the Throne.

A changing media landscape means there will be more online media with employees and freelancers who may not fall under the traditional description of “journalist.” As the large media corporations slash staff and cut back on local content, there is still a public demand for news. Citizens are turning online for their news sources, something that most of these news companies already recognize.

As the corporate media cuts back, I expect some newly unemployed journalists to start their own innovative online news companies. New trusted sources for political information will continue to sprout up online – this cannot be stopped by the government or the already established media companies.