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Episode 50: Supervised Consumption Services in Alberta with Dr. Elaine Hyshka

Dr. Elaine Hyshka, assistant professor at the University of Alberta School of Public Health, joins Dave Cournoyer to discuss supervised consumption clinics in Alberta and the flaws in the United Conservative Party government’s recent review of the facilities on the latest episode of the Daveberta Podcast.

Elaine shares her insights into the history of harm reduction and recovery efforts in Alberta, how these programs help Albertans, and what the future of supervised consumption clinics might be in Alberta.

The Daveberta Podcast is a member of the Alberta Podcast Network, powered by ATB. The Alberta Podcast Network includes more than 30 great made-in-Alberta podcasts.

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As always, a big thank you to our producer Adam Rozenhart for all his hard work in making the show sound so great.

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1 reply on “Episode 50: Supervised Consumption Services in Alberta with Dr. Elaine Hyshka”

The real reason for the government’s lukewarm support for SCS is simple: they don’t accept the reality that addiction is a disease. They see it as a moral failing, and safe consumption services as enabling illegal activity.

Never mind that some substances — for instance, ethanol, tobacco, sleeping pills, etc. — have been abused equally by conservatives, liberals, and social democrats throughout the history of Western culture; these inveterate social conservatives think that the mere fact that drugs of abuse like heroin are illegal makes them also a sin.

Sadly, morality — whether supportable or misguided — is not easily swayed by anything so secular as “evidence”, so don’t expect it to be easy to convince these troglodytes of the righteousness of harm reduction.

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